BLOG

Take a gander at the blog articles down below. Some are curated  articles from other sources on the web, and others are posts that we put together for you.

If you’d like to see a topic discussed, just let us know in the comments on the Post and we’ll try to get back with you about the subject.

Happy hunting. 🙂

… So here is the backup tactical p320 full size precision match grade threaded barrel absolutely beautiful, so we’re going to take off the thread protector here all the threaded barrels from backup tactical come with a
thread protector got to keep those threads protected now a threaded barrel can be used for a comp or a compensator, or it can be used for a suppressor, so it’s good to have that versatility out there so having a threaded barrel is a
great way to go so let’s go ahead and the barrel is a match grade precision machined beautiful durable threaded barrel for the SIG p320 full size threaded barrel..

Watch Youtube Video Review here…

Backup Tactical Corp, has finally brought their barrel manufacturing expertise to SIG Sauer 9mm pistols. As of today, Backup Tactical is shipping Threaded Barrels for both the Compact and Full-Size Sig P320 line of pistols to their Distributor (RSR Group), retailers, and retail customers. The barrels are available in Black (Black Nitride finish) or FDE (Titanium Nitride finish) for both the Compact and Full-Sized P320 9mm pistols. For the next few days, the P320 Threaded Barrels will be available on their website, www.backuptactical.com and in a week or so at firearm accessory retailers everywhere.

The Backup Tactical Sig P320 threaded barrels are competitively priced at $169.99 regardless of size or finish and include a color-matching thread protector. The first production run of Sig P320 barrels are shipping with their best-selling FRAG Thread Protector (shown in pictures above and below).

Read the full article here…

Having run a number of my AR-15s in 5.56 and 300 BLK with suppressors over the years, I’m no stranger to the unpleasant gas and powder blowback in my eyes that comes along with suppressed experience. So, when I made the decision to go all-in and order an integrally suppressed AR-15 upper in 5.56, I knew I was going to be spending some time figuring out how to reduce that blowback to some extent or another.

To introduce some urgency to the situation, I decided my goal is to make this integrally suppressed AR-15 my go-to rifle. Which means I’m going to practice regularly with it and it’s going to get a lot of use.

If you have never shot a suppressed AR-15 in 5.56, much of the gas and unburnt powder that normally comes out the muzzle when you shoot unsuppressed, gets blown back into the upper receiver.

The problem is that gas has to come out somehow.

Unfortunately, the primary places for the gas to escape are located directly under your eyes and nose; mainly the spaces around the charging handle where it locks into the upper receiver and around the forward assist where it’s inserted into the upper.

The gas isn’t just unpleasant, it actually burns your eyes and forces your eyelids to close. As you would imagine, the quicker and more frequently you pull the trigger, the worse it gets.

Read the full article here...

As a 1911 fan and daily carrier, when Browning first introduced the 1911-380 and 1911-22 a few years back I was intrigued. I wasn’t sure if these were practical guns or more of a novelty. I did a little research and read the reviews I could find about them, but the price seemed a little much for something that may be nothing more than a novelty for me.

Browning sells quality firearms, which is why their firearms are generally on the more expensive side compared to similar models from other manufacturers. For the premium you pay for a Browning firearm there is no doubt you can expect to get a gun that is very nicely machined with excellent fit and finish.

Over the last few months I have started to see what I consider very good deals on many of the Browning 1911 variants in both .22LR and .380 Auto. When I saw I could pick up a 1911-22 for around $350, I decided it was finally time to see if one of these mini 1911 pistols were worth adding to my collection. So, I ordered the 1911-.22 pictured below. It’s the compact version of the 1911-22 with the 3.6” barrel.

My 1911-22 originally came with a standard non-threaded barrel.

I contacted Browning’s parts department and found out I could buy a threaded barrel directly from them for around $150 delivered.

While I have many .22LR hosts for my several .22 suppressors, I couldn’t resist being able to see how well the Browning would do with a can.

Read the full article here...

Backup Tactical has spent the last six months perfecting their Glock 48 Threaded Barrel. The single-stack Glock 48 is noticeably thinner than its double-stack big-brother, the Glock 19. In order to make the Glock 48 as thin as it is, the hole in the muzzle-end of the slide that the barrel goes through has a noticeably smaller diameter than the same hole in the Glock 19.

That means the barrel has a smaller diameter.

Simply put, the Glock 48 barrel is thinner than the Glock 19 barrel.

The big challenge when engineering a threaded barrel for the Glock 48; the small diameter of this barrel does not leave any room to machine a shoulder on the barrel for the suppressor to lock-up against. The simple solution would be to use a barrel spacer for the suppressor to lock-up against. But using a barrel spacer on any caliber other than .22LR never works out well in the long run.

The spacer winds up deforming and battering the suppressor or accessory you attach to the barrel. 

Read the full article here...

Backup Tactical has spent the last six months perfecting their Glock 48 Threaded Barrel. TFBTV covered the Glock 48 and 43X earlier this year so go check out that video if you’ve been living under a rock. The single-stack Glock 48 is noticeably thinner than its double-stack big-brother, the Glock 19. In order to make the Glock 48 as thin as it is, the hole in the muzzle end of the slide that the barrel goes through has a noticeably smaller diameter than the same hole in the Glock 19.

That means the barrel has a smaller diameter. Simply put, the Glock 48 barrel is thinner than the Glock 19 barrel. The big challenge when engineering a threaded barrel for the Glock 48; the small diameter of this barrel does not leave any room to machine a shoulder on the barrel for the suppressor to lock-up against.

The simple solution would be to use a barrel spacer for the suppressor to lock- up against.

But using a barrel spacer on any caliber other than .22LR never works out well in the long run. The spacer winds up deforming and battering the suppressor or accessory you attach to the barrel. The only other viable option was to determine the perfect length for the barrel so the muzzle of the barrel would shoulder up against the internal shoulder of the piston

This meant coming up with the exact right barrel length so the muzzle will shoulder on internal shoulder of the piston for all the 9mm pistol suppressors currently on the market.

Read the full article here...

Login

New here? Register now. Need to reset your password? Click here.